SNPsvg

I wrote a quick Perl script to visualize SNPs in a gene from experimental evolution sequencing data.  Useful for making figures when one gene is hit by mutations in multiple lineages.  It outputs an SVG file with the reference sequence and the changes.

For the moment, it only visualizes substitutions, not insertions/deletions or anything more exotic.  More to come.

Example: SNPs found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene PA2449 (converted to PNG)

figure

(Thanks to Sofia Robb for teaching Perl as part of Programming for Evolutionary Biology!)

Download SNPsvg here.

 

Turdus merula

Turdus merula

The Common Blackbird (Turdus merula) is a species of true thrush. It is also called Eurasian Blackbird (especially in North America, to distinguish it from the unrelated New World blackbirds),[2] or simply Blackbird, where this does not lead to confusion with a similar-looking local species. It breeds in Europe, Asia, and North Africa, and has been introduced to Australia (where it is considered a pest) and New Zealand. It has a number of subspecies across its large range; a few of the Asian subspecies are sometimes considered to be full species. Depending on latitude, the Common Blackbird may be resident, partially migratory or fully migratory.

More from Wikipedia

Regex to change bracket citations into bibtex keys

Useful for converting in-text citations (from e.g. Word) into a LaTeX document.  Converts bracket notation into first 3 chars of first author’s last name (or 2 chars, if only 2 chars long), plus two-digit year: e.g. (Bobby 2009) becomes \citep{Bob09}.  See also my post on how to insert bibtex references into Word.

Search for:

\(([A-Za-z]{2,3})[A-Za-z -.]* (18|19|20)([0-9a-z]{2,3})\)

Replace with:

\\citep{\1\3}

Test citations:

(Bobby 2009)
(Bobby and Jonny 1909)
(Bobby et al. 1923)

(Maynard Smith 1989)
(Maynard Smith and Haigh 1974)
(Maynard Smith and Bobby-Jonny 1974)
(Maynard Smith and Maynard Smith 1974)
(Maynard Smith et al. 1993)

(Maisnier-Patin 1900)
(Maisnier-Patin and Bobby-Jonny 1956)
(Maisnier-Patin et al. 2002)

(Aa 1932)
(Aaa 1932)

Fluctuation test calculator: FALCOR copy/paste issue

FALCOR (Fluctuation AnaLysis CalculatOR) is a handy Java applet designed to estimate mutation rates from fluctuation test data.  A Java update prevents access to the clipboard to unsigned Java applets.  If you are having trouble copy/pasting your data into FALCOR, try modifying your java.policy file to include the line: permission java.awt.AWTPermission “accessClipboard” under where it says //”standard” properties that can be read by anyone.

// “standard” properties that can be read by anyone
permission java.awt.AWTPermission “accessClipboard”;

Save the file, exit and restart Java (or any programs using it, like Firefox or LibreOffice), and copy/paste should work again.  You may wish to consider removing the clipboard access after using FALCOR for security reasons.

Muzzling Canadian government workers

90% of federal scientists cannot speak freely

Over the past few years, there has been much attention given to the restrictions placed on scientists employed by the Canadian government.  A report recently produced by PIPSC has shown that 90% of government scientists do not feel they can speak freely to the media about their research.  Although this is an important issue, the problem runs much deeper.  What the reports fail to mention is that all federal government employees, scientists or not, must obtain permission to speak to the media in the capacity of their jobs.  The policies aren’t a only a direct affront to science, but also on the free sharing of information.